We got Beef (The Kobe discussion)

So all the foodies and bloggers have gotten their Canon DSLR bags in a knot over the news *gasp* Kobe Beef, isnt really Kobe anymore. This has caused the usual, holier than thou and less informed than most response. As per usual for the twitter food community. index

Here is the original link for a story posted in the Edmonton Journal today by food columnist Liane Faulder, in regards to “Kobe” Beef not really being Kobe anymore and Edmonton Chef’s and restaurants shitting their pants because bloggers and your average food lover are starting to notice. She is one of the last few hopes for real food journalism in this city and I only hope she is offered the opportunity for more writing like this.

http://edmontonjournal.com/life/food/confusion-over-kobe-beef-sends-twitter-atwitter

Here is a little background on the type of cattle, trade disputes and the current legal action to remove “Kobe” as a term on menu’s that do not use directly sourced meat from Japan. Which I agree with and understand. You cannot just call anything champagne and Kobe is the Champagne of meat.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kobe_beef

 

here is my response. Pardon the grammar and run on sentences

1. Thankfully the “Kobe” Beef issue has now boiled down to the fact that legally and ethically. Chef’s in North America cannot steal the glory that is this style of Beef and animal. This has caused many to come out looking like the half ass heels they are and most of the time this problem has already corrected itself with the industry policing itself. Integrity is huge for us and most Chef’s about 3-4 years ago stopped putting it on the menu.

2. People really have no idea where their food comes from, the impacts etc. Pretentious bloggers sometimes have a benefit of being the brutally annoying canary in the coal mine. “Local” is not always best. I said it. I mean it and stand by that. The responsibility falls on a Chef to use the best they can and if they can find a local source, the duty is there to use them. Supporting local is always the hope but everyone can eat a huge bag of locally sourced d@cks if they think anyone has to use the greenhouse tomatoes from the commune outside of town just because. I can easily pick apart any menu in town based on this common sense. Not with malice or ridicule but if you serve a cocktail, an entree and maybe a salad. At some point your menu can fall apart to examination. Except Costa, the guy is a freak and I think even the light bulbs in his joint are straight from the old world.

3. I wish Liane would have pushed on the “Camrose” Waygu more. As that isnt even guaranteed to be from that specific farm. The reason being, like the Alberta regular beef pool. Waygu, is for some producers, pooled in such a fashion that even though I wanted to buy from the Camrose location for the Hart House menu. They could not guarantee I wouldn’t get product pooled from other locations, mixed with theirs. Get that. 5 km out of town, raise the animals but can’t guarantee I would even get them. Welcome foodies, bloggers and truth seekers to the reality of our current chain of food. Especially for proteins. This gives me more pause as to becoming vegetarian eventually as it seems from a quality standpoint. We are brutally out of touch with sustainable production chains.

4. Brant Lake Waygu, is raised IN Brant Lake, can be purchased through Community Food Services out of Calgary. I went with them because I got straight answers, competitive rates and a good conscience out of it. End of story. Chef’s have a high impact, stress and bullshit ridden life. Sometimes we get lazy. I have been guilty of it. This is nothing nefarious. But with the cats listed I would have to say its a laziness issue. It does take time but like with Earl’s it falls on us.

the Burly Chef